Is sunscreen safe? Many sunscreens contain harmful toxins, but zinc oxide sunscreen is one of the safer options for you and your children.

Are Sunscreens Safe?

There’s a widely perpetuated myth out there that sun exposure is bad for you and that you should always apply sunscreen before going out in the sun. Don’t buy into this myth, folks! Some sun exposure is absolutely essential for your health, and many sunscreens can actually harm your health.

Sunscreen and Skin Cancer

We all know two main reasons that getting too much sun is bad for us: premature aging, and – more importantly – increased risk of skin cancer.

Chronic, excessive exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun or tanning booths can cause wrinkles by breaking down collagen and elastin, connective tissues that keep our skin firm and young. Getting too much sun also significantly increases risk of common skin cancers like non-melanoma basal and squamous cell carcinomas, especially if you’ve also suffered bad sunburns during childhood and adolescence. And if you are a person with many moles and fair features such as blue eyes and red hair, you do have an increased risk of developing melanoma, a much more serious type of skin cancer (interestingly, melanoma can develop on areas of the skin not generally exposed to the sun).

All considered, it seems like a no-brainer to slather on copious amounts of sunscreen, right? Nope. After learning what I have about sunscreens, I don’t think they are the best sun exposure solution.

Why Sunscreens Are Not the Best Sun Protection

According to the Environmental Working Group (EWG), a leading environmental health research and advocacy watchdog organization, more people than ever use sunscreen, skin cancer incidence continues to rise, even among frequent sunscreen users:

There is little scientific evidence to suggest that sunscreen alone reduces cancer risk, particularly for melanoma, the most deadly type of skin cancer. Despite a growing awareness of the dangers of exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet radiation, and a multi-billion dollar sunscreen industry, melanoma rates have tripled over the past three decades.”

Here’s one reason why: feeling protected, people are apt to spend more time in the sun than people who don’t use sunscreen. Problem with this is, most sunscreens produced within the past several decades don’t actually offer much sun protection because they were designed to block only UVB (shorter wavelength) and not UVA (longer wavelength) rays. Both types of UV can cause skin cancer and accelerated skin aging. And UVBs only account for 3 to 5 percent of the total UV radiation that makes it through our atmosphere, while UVA rays constitute the remaining 95 to 97 percent and they penetrate deeper into the skin. Hence, many sunscreens offer a false sense of protection.

Ideally, you want a “broad spectrum” sunscreen, one that has passed testing approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2012, and which protects against both types of UVs.

There’s another catch here. Sunscreens often contain toxic chemicals, especially the products that you spray on. Some of the common risks posed by these chemicals include allergies, endocrine dysfunction, neurological, reproductive and immune system toxicity, and even cancer. Using chemical-laden sunscreen for a week during a tropical vacation probably won’t hurt you, but regular use for years and years does carry a risk.

Sunscreens may not only be toxic for the people using them, but they also contribute to environmental pollution. When you shower and wash off those chemicals, they go down the drain, and into an aquatic environment, adding to an already serious man-made burden on the environment. Theoretically, fish and other water life will suffer the consequences. It’s possible also for sunscreen wash-out to reach our water supply as well.

How to Find “Safe” Sunscreens

To be really frank here, there really aren’t any entirely safe sunscreens. Some are simply less toxic than others. If you’re going to be out in the sun a lot, or during peak hours for more than 20 minutes, try finding the least toxic, most natural sunscreen you can that also offers “full spectrum” protection.  Also look for a product with an SPF (which means “skin protection factor”) of 30 or more.

Go Online to EWG’s 2016 Guide to Sunscreens

What would we do without the EWG? This watchdog group’s efforts are how you spell relief. Since 2004, EWG has offered an online (and free) Skin Deep database, through which you can learn which sunscreens are “safe” and which are more toxic. You’ll also find reviews there of all sorts of other personal products like shampoos, lotions, and deodorants.

EWG made it even easier this year with its 2016 Guide to Sunscreens. Here, you can browse sunscreen-specific sub-databases for the best beach and sports sunscreens, best and worst scoring kids’ sunscreens, and more.

In general, EWG recommends using mineral sunscreens that have compounds such as zinc oxide or titanium dioxide over non-mineral types, containing substances like avobenzone, octinoxate and oxybenzone. Some sunscreens are both mineral and non-mineral. It’s best to avoid the non-mineral chemicals, especially oxybenzone. Mineral sunscreens pose less risk of toxicity while providing better UVA protection. However, they still contain nanoparticles that can be toxic if they enter the bloodstream, for example after absorption through the skin.

EWG’s safest pick is zinc oxide sunscreen (what the lifeguards used to put on their noses and lips) – something used to treat diaper rash: “It is stable in sunlight and can provide greater protection from UVA rays than titanium oxide or any other sunscreen chemical approved in the U.S.” Citing the need for more research and FDA guidelines to help reduce any risk posed by mineral sunscreens, and to maximize their sun protection effectiveness, EWG also notes, “even with the existing uncertainties, we believe that zinc oxide and titanium dioxide lotions are among the best choices on the American market.”

Read Sunscreens- Biohazards: Treat as Hazardous Waste

If you like to spend a lot of time out in the sun, as I do, I strongly recommend educating yourself, as I did, by reading Sunscreens- Biohazards: Treat as Hazardous Waste, by Elizabeth Plourde, Ph.D. She has gathered a wealth of eye-opening information that will make you think twice about what you smear on your skin before you go out and bake in the sun. You may very well be causing damage and premature aging, just the very things you think you are trying to protect yourself against.

Why You Need Some Unprotected Sun Exposure

As I mention in Is Sunshine Good for You?, absorbing sunlight is the most natural way for your body to get the Vitamin D it needs to stay healthy. The key is getting the right amount of sun. Ideally, to get enough Vitamin D, you should expose your skin to the sun’s mid-day rays (between peak hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.) for 10 to 20 minutes each day. It’s important that you don’t wear sunscreen during this time because sunscreen inhibits vitamin D3 synthesis by blocking UV rays. But if you are out in the sun regularly and for longer periods of time, especially during peak hours, you may put yourself at risk of UV damage if you don’t use protective clothing or sunscreen. Sunlight, truly, is a double-edged sword.

Sun Protection Methods that Are Safer than Sunscreen

Until an absolutely safe sunscreen is found, my advice is to wear sun protective shirts and other protective clothing (I sure do!) such as a wide-brimmed hat, and stay in the shade as much as possible. That’s the best protection.

Michael F. Holick, M.D., a leading medical expert on Vitamin D, advises people to shield their faces when out in the sun because faces get the most sun exposure and are most prone to damage. Better to expose your arms, legs, back or stomach area when trying to absorb some rays, he says.

Face masks, which screen out 95 percent of UV rays, are often available through fishing and skiing retailers. That’s another good form of protection.

I also recommend CoQ10 (100-150 mg daily). This super supplement can provide protection for the first 15-20 minutes in the sun, when the body’s own supply is used up as an antioxidant in the skin.

My Sun Story

My mom – a fair-skinned, Irish gal, had skin cancer (basal and squamous cell carcinoma) when she was in her sixties and had to undergo extensive surgery as a result. So, with that kind of family history and my own fair skin, I’ve long been aware of my vulnerability. So, being the “sun-phobe” I am, an avid fisherman and skier for many years, I have learned to cover up almost completely whenever I’m in the sun for more than a few minutes.

I follow the advice that I’ve been giving others to the letter, and even beyond. I used to be the “king of sunblock” until I found out that there is no safe sunblock. I’ve always worn hats, long pants, long sleeves, and big sunglasses. On beach vacations I imagine I can be downright embarrassing to be seen with. I have barely a shred of skin uncovered. Though some might think me “overboard,” I’m just trying to protect myself as best as I can.

You can imagine the shock I experienced in fall of 2011 when I learned that some innocent-looking little spots on my face were squamous cell lesions, despite all my prevention.

Let my story serve as a warning. Whether you have fair skin or not, make it your business to treat the sun with the greatest respect.

My Bottom Line Sun Recommendations:

  • Get enough daily sun (10 – 20 minutes), unprotected; after that wear protective clothing, stay in the shade, or find the least toxic, most natural sunscreen you can that also is broad spectrum (has passed testing approved by the FDA in 2012). I agree with EWG: zinc oxide sunscreen is okay.
  • Visit a dermatologist regularly, and have him or her visually scan your whole body. If you have a history of skin cancer, discuss it with your dermatologist.
  • Spend time outdoors, e.g. walking or doing yard work, when the sun is weaker: in early morning or evening hours.
  • Worship the shade instead of the sun when relaxing outdoors.

References and Resources:

© 2014, 2016 HeartMD Institute. All rights reserved.

Leave a Reply

9 Comments

  1. Joe Eudovich

    on March 27, 2014 at 5:18 pm

    Reply

    What do you think of Astaxanthin as an internal sun block?

  2. Pat Whitehead

    on March 27, 2014 at 5:56 pm

    Reply

    I am confused; Your advice is to cover up when in the sun but I thought the objective was to expose skin to absorb the rays to get Vitamin D.
    I have fair skin and skin cancer in my family.
    Do the sun’s rays penetrate clothing? If not, how does staying in the shade serve any purpose.

  3. Richard Kurylski

    on March 27, 2014 at 8:19 pm

    Reply

    It should be stressed that only UVB rays help us produce vitamin D. Both UVA and UVB burn. The former penetrate far deeper (problems of melanomas), therefore even glass will not protect us completely. People can “fry themselves” unknowingly in their offices.
    Using traditional sunscreens SPF with high number will protect us from UVB rays, but will not protect us from UVAs. Sunscreens PPD or Japanese version PA will stop UVAs but not UVBs. The solution? If we look for vitamin D, we should expose our bodies around the solar noon (which is not always the midday, but half way between sunrise and sunset) from 10 to 30 min depending on the latitude, our type of skin, age and the surroundings. And that will be enough to get 10-20 thousand iu.

  4. Margaret McGrory

    on March 28, 2014 at 9:13 am

    Reply

    Hi Dr Sinatra, Thank you for your piece on sun exposure, I read where you say your mother is an Irish women, Could you please tell me what County in Ireland she comes from, I am from Ireland and i live in Co Donegal, ‘The Hills of Donegal’ if you have ever heard the song, and one more question’ have you ever being to Ireland, if not you must come and visit our Emerald isle, with all its tradition and culture, O and not forgetting the Guinness, Come visit us and as we say here in Ireland you’ll enjoy the craic. Margaret

  5. Tony Phillips

    on March 28, 2014 at 6:04 pm

    Reply

    Go in the sun for 10 to 20 minutes a day, but no longer without adequate covering or sun screen. If you are very fair skinned, then do your “Sun” in the morning or late afternoon when the sun is weaker.

  6. Norman Kurnit

    on March 28, 2014 at 6:15 pm

    Reply

    I largely agree with Richard Kurylski, but I had also read somewhere that the longer wavelength UVA not only penetrates more deeply and can cause cancers, but actually inhibits the production of Vitamin D. So sunscreens that block UVA and not UVB may make sense, at least for short-term exposures.

  7. Vince Carlone

    on March 30, 2014 at 7:32 pm

    Reply

    Loss of pigmentation keeps me out of the sun as blotches of white contrast with tan areas. Do I need natural sunlight in addition Vitamin D supplementation?

  8. sue lelliott

    on March 5, 2015 at 8:23 pm

    Reply

    The vitamin D council says you only get vitamin D form the sun if your shadow is shorter than you.

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